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Here is one view of the GIant Hogweed plant from below. (Photo: Shutterstock)

If someone gives you a Giant Hogweed plant as a gift, that person is not your friend. And "leave" this plant (otherwise known as the cartwheel-flowera or Heracleum mantegazzianum) alone. Don’t even touch it, and get some professional help. Because the Giant Hogweed (not to be confused with Hogwarts) is basically a big obnoxious bleep.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) indicates that the Giant Hogweed is listed as a Federal Noxious Weed under the Plant Protection Act. It’s bad enough to be called a weed, let alone a noxious weed. This makes it illegal to import or transport this plant across State lines without a permit. If your job is to smuggle Giant Hogweed, it’s time to find another job. 

The plant is a member of the carrot family (Apiaceae) but contact with the plant can result in a "what’s up doc?" According to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, the plant produces a sap that when combined with moisture and sunlight can burn your skin and eyes, potentially resulting in painful blistering, long-time sun sensitivity, permanent scarring, and even permanent blindness. Any part of your body that touches this sap essentially needs to be treated like a very dirty vampire as soon as possible: thoroughly washed with soap and water and kept away from sunlight for 48 hours. If you suspect any burns or any other damage to your skin or eyes, see a doctor as soon as possible.

Here’s a Good Morning Britain segment covering a girl who got burned by the plant:

Ouch. As you can see, simply brushing up against the plant can be dangerous. The sap is also the reason why you should not take a weed whacker to the plant. Such a whack job could essentially create a mist of dangerous sap, resulting in third-degree burns all over your body. Instead you’ll need someone with protective gear to either remove the entire plant or use herbicides such as glycophsophate or triclopyr to kill the plant.

Here is another view of the Giant Hogweed plant. (Photo: Shutterstock)

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Here is one view of the GIant Hogweed plant from below. (Photo: Shutterstock)

If someone gives you a Giant Hogweed plant as a gift, that person is not your friend. And “leave” this plant (otherwise known as the cartwheel-flowera or Heracleum mantegazzianum) alone. Don’t even touch it, and get some professional help. Because the Giant Hogweed (not to be confused with Hogwarts) is basically a big obnoxious bleep.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) indicates that the Giant Hogweed is listed as a Federal Noxious Weed under the Plant Protection Act. It’s bad enough to be called a weed, let alone a noxious weed. This makes it illegal to import or transport this plant across State lines without a permit. If your job is to smuggle Giant Hogweed, it’s time to find another job. 

The plant is a member of the carrot family (Apiaceae) but contact with the plant can result in a “what’s up doc?” According to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, the plant produces a sap that when combined with moisture and sunlight can burn your skin and eyes, potentially resulting in painful blistering, long-time sun sensitivity, permanent scarring, and even permanent blindness. Any part of your body that touches this sap essentially needs to be treated like a very dirty vampire as soon as possible: thoroughly washed with soap and water and kept away from sunlight for 48 hours. If you suspect any burns or any other damage to your skin or eyes, see a doctor as soon as possible.

Here’s a Good Morning Britain segment covering a girl who got burned by the plant:

Ouch. As you can see, simply brushing up against the plant can be dangerous. The sap is also the reason why you should not take a weed whacker to the plant. Such a whack job could essentially create a mist of dangerous sap, resulting in third-degree burns all over your body. Instead you’ll need someone with protective gear to either remove the entire plant or use herbicides such as glycophsophate or triclopyr to kill the plant.

Here is another view of the Giant Hogweed plant. (Photo: Shutterstock)

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